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to make a positive contribution to society a fair access to education, employment and =tranfour and indeed discrimination is the real challenge we face. let's let them give us the opportunities they deserve. [applause] >> jack, thank you bring much indeed for the beach. i am looking for a contributor from the east midlands. whoever thought? please, welcome. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i agree with my fellow same-sex marriage is an highly important issue and is widely spoken about as at present the case it would be one of our debates today. however, i feel it is a nonpowered young people can agree. many kids in my constituency when i consorted them said yes it is the highest important topic. but when i went back to front of this county said they would want to see campaign. that shows that it was at the moment something being done about it. the mission of the government are saying in part of their manifestoes they want is to have been by 2015. i feel there is a more important issue in the debate last. they restarted their curriculum and now isn't the right time to look at same-sex marriage. t
at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message from the prime minister, from yorkshire. [applause] member of the parliament, i'm -- [inaudible] we are -- this is your opportunity to debate -- by more than [inaudible] 260,000 people. -- [inaudible] include -- [inaudible] the children and the people. he has -- [inaudible] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth
-profit, non- partisan. since 2001, our focus has been on educating the public on public policy. and fostering the future leaders from our minority communities to serve at federal, state, and local levels. the mission is to empower patients and pacific islander americans in civic and public affairs to education, active participation, and leadership development. >> civic engagement, leadership development, and community servthe theme of tonight's evens a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of asian-americans in the state of california and our nation. >> ok'ing. -- ok. i would like to introduce our host for this evening. very well known as the first asian-american mayor in san francisco history. mayor lee championed balancing the budget to keep san francisco safe, solvents, and successful. he reformed city pensions. his focus is on economic development, job creation, and building san francisco's future. a great job, especially for helping out families. we want to keep families here. i also wanted to mention a little bit of his past. he was born in 1952 in the beacon hill neighbor
't do anything useful just like a newborn is limited in skill, without an education or supporting the paradigm for a i, artificial intelligence, to educate them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neocortex is as opposed to the brain? >> guest: the old brain and the new brain. the new brain is the neocortex. only mammals have the neocortex. these early mammals emerged over 1 hundred million years ago, the neocortex is the size of a postage stamp and is basically the outer layer, neocortex means new rind, of the brain and capable of thinking in a hierarchical fashion. >> host: that is the part of the brain you are focusing on. >> caller: -- >> guest: it has complexity 2. twenty-nine and change quickly they were able to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, somethi
. the same thing can exist for education. it personalized health care system and education system available to the student and available to anyone of any age on any platform at any time. the advances you see in entertainment and gaming are possible in health care, education and all government services. >> if we can dig down into education a bit more because i think the disparity in our education system, the haves and have nots in terms of education is another major barrier in terms of keeping the american dream alive. our education system has basically worked the same from inception. the classroom that my daughter will be in looks like the one i was in. looks like the one my parents were in. it seems like that we may may be on the verge of a technological revolution. some example i will give you is these massive open online courses where high level institutions like harvard and mit are opening up courses to thousands of people around the world, typically free and typically no credit given. students are grading each other because there so many you could never hope to have a professor grade a
a choice. and they are here and they have been educated in america and we're trying to give them a legal status that doesn't allow am fear of deportation. allows them go to college or go to school and stay here if they want to. if they want to become citizens, they can apply and get in line and abide by the law as it is today. we don't change the law. we don't prohibit them. but we don't give them the cut in line before the people who have it withed for years to get that green card or citizenship. gerri: i want to switch gears here a little bit. you wrote a op-ed, calling on washington, calling on congress and the president not to raise taxes on small business operators. what do you fear and what would you like to see hpen? >> i think we're going to just wreck this very fragile economy if we raise taxes on the people who are creating jobs. they want to create jobs. we need to give the people in small business a stability, and a predictability. they need to know what to expect and all the president talks about is more taxes and more taxes and more taxes. and, on top of health care, that's
's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smaller classes. no high-capacity schools, because they produce morons. the great and the good want their kids to have the best. you mentioned something that i disagree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans -- naturally, americans would be the first to enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1972. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. real hourly wages were declining. they were working longer hours. that put enormous strain on families. my friends in
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
. hundreds of educators attend a free gun class in utah. it's the latest response to the newtown school massacre that's attracting a lot of attention this morning. >>> thousands of dockworkers could put the u.s. economy at risk if they go on strike on sunday. we'll take you inside the crisis some are calling the container cliff. >>> and sea world taking its water act all the way to wall street. why investors could soon own a peace of shamu. "newsroom" starts right now. good morning. i'm victor blackwell. carol has the morning off. with the nation still reeling from the shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut, and engaged in a national debate on gun control, chicago suffered a grim milestone last night, a man was killed in a shooting on chicago's dangerous west side. this scene marks chicago's 500th homicide this year alone. that's up more than 50 from last year. now when we're researching this story this morning, one statistic really jumped out at us. in the past five years, 270 children have been killed by gun violence in chicago. on top of that, there have been dozens of other peopl
regarding their voting records and actions in regard to, say, equity in education and access to health care and fiar pay. and i actually have to say i link the fairness and focus on just this in regard to domestic issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever b
protection. the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. >> reporter: education secretary, duncan, in his first public remarks since the shooting says the fashion's overall gun policy needs a change. >> one disturbed young man was mad at the world. i can not help but wonder what he might have done or how it would have been different if he did not have access to those guns. >>> president barack obama observed his own moment of silents days after his call for a panel to address gun policy. hoping no community has to endure newtown's heartbreak again. in washington, ktvu channel 2 news. >> shame on the nra! >> reporter: code pink protesters disrupted that rifle association press conference in wash wash twice. demonstrators held up signs saying nra, blood on your hands and the nra is killing our kids. critics are blasting today's response about making schools safer. ahead in 9 minutes bay area educators tell fuss more guns would -- teleus more guns would better protect our students -- tell us more guns would better protect our students. >>> a twist on the gun buy ba
powell. [applause] we are thrilled to have our local and national education and safety leaders here to discuss the promise neighborhood program and how we promote safety in our schools. i have been a principal and excited and delighted principal in this community for 80 years. i know how hard families work a day in and day out to achieve academically support each other and the community and to make sure our children have six classrooms, said playgrounds -- safe classrooms, safe playgrounds, and save homes to welcome them. this school has been a proud a partner of the thomas neighborhood initiative. i realize some of our struggling students addressing these challenges in the class term alone was not going to be enough to help get them on the path to success and achieve what we know they are capable of in the future. we need to work with a broader coalition of partners to address their needs outside of the classroom, in the home, on the streets in the community. i am so thankful to our founder. [applause] for starting this hard work, they have continued the hard work over the past yea
clark oposian, whose group put on the education, and dennis vac rockle p what are teachers telling you? >> they've had an emipiphany of sorts. the only training so far has lock the doors and hide behind the desk. we need to give them another option. we had about 200 teachers, other school employees as well. >> you've down this a long time. what percentage after the training end up getting guns. >> some of them already have firearms. i don't know, but the majority of those that i still communicate with, they have their firearms and carrying in schools. >> listen to one teacher that went through the training. >> now, especially, i'm thinking this would be a great opportunity to probably the children, protect the classroom and the teachers if that opportunity arose. that's the reason i'm here. >> what's the reaction to that. they fair carrying concealed weapons inside schools. >> well, as a high school math teacher for 23 years, i can tell you that guns do not belong in schools, period. i believe this is a complex problem action and to suggest there is one solution, to put more guns in sc
kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not.
are holding onto as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy, and i would hope that whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply, deeply focused on adult learning, and of education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> counselor? >> i would concur on those points. i'm grateful i live in a state that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of those percentages, and people that has been struggling and people living in poverty. if you talk about the shrinking middle class, who were the joining? and so i want a president and governor and a major that believes in making those critical investment in physical infrastructure and in people that support the rule t
-secondary education. canadas taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. only the japanese actually make sense, they pay higher taxes, 47.2% and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of cnn's fareed zakaria gps and has a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. entitled "tough decisions." i asked him are american taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, for sure he's paying more. but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high-quality. he gets a free education. from kindergarten through any master's bachelor's ph.d. program he wants and it's pretty high quality as well. he gets free retraining if he ever loses his job. he gets all the benefits like day care and things like that europe is famous for. and the person in the united stat
they're happier? because it pays for free education, post secondary, canadi canadians, by the way, pay more than the u.s., as well, 46.4% in taxes. why are they happier? because their taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. we don't know why that happens. the japanese make sense. higher taxes, 47.2%, and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of "fareed zakaria: gps." he's got a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern titled "tough decisions." i asked him, are american taxpayers getting their money's worth? >> imagine a guy in germany. probably he pays, particular pi upper middle class or upper class, probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart, though it's not xwirly clear once you add value-added tax consumption. >> good point. >> but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high quality, he gets a free education from kindergarten through any master's, bachelor's, ph.d. program he wants and it's pretty high quality as well. he ge
my grandchildren to rely on nature is good will to survive. they need an education so they can lead this land. >> the school is funded by a local charity. the goal is to ensure the children still get a basic education. this 8-year-old wants to become an engineer. he says he wants to build a wall to protect bangladesh from slumps. -- from floods. by the time these children become adults, one-third of bangladesh territory will be permanently flooded. the himalayan glacier a, a source of all major rivers in bangladesh, but because of rising temperatures, those glaciers are melting at an unprecedented rate. this, along with deforestation of the continent, causes the rivers downstream to overflow. as bangladesh is a low-lying delta, on average just 1 meter above sea level, people's homes and livelihoods are being destroyed. under these waters is an entire village. seasonal floods and torrential monsoon rains gradually wiped it off the map. all those old enough to have moved away to find work. the young and the elderly have stayed on. this person and his two grandchildren now live on a bo
predicting it would be jam san francisco instead of san francisco you knew that folks were educated because of the great leadership at our mta, our county transportation, all of our transit systems and were at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our caltrans, to up and down our muni lines. this central subway will be a great success. it will connect to some of the most densely populated and rapidly developing areas, and it will improve access to all of our vibrant communities, and really is investments like this that will foster loyalty among all of our public transit customers while we reduce carbon emissions, make our city cleaner and cleaner. i'm not the only one that thinks this way. you know i'm among many, many friends today in the audience, on stage and i would like to
much of a formal education that had a ph.d. in life. and she heard that john f. kennedy was coming. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is inc
election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama car
of the universities are earning more than ever. so i think more investment in training and education would help. >> what about the number, 250, 400 or 1 million in terms of where that threshold will be, where taxes will be raised? >> i think that all those numbers matters, but the important thing about the fiscal cliff is there will be a big increase, the payroll deduction will hit all families, middle class, working family. >> the 2%. >> yes. the unemployment extension will end. there's a tremendous amount of taxes that will go on lower income and middle-income americans if it goes into effect. >> let me ask you this, though. in that idea that you've just been describing, then, should middle-class tax rates also be cut? >> i think that would help -- well, we need to reach a consensus. what we saw was sort of policy pa razz. in indiana, they privatized their system, a republican idea that you need to create more incentives. to be frank, it didn't work. in massachusetts the idea was improving education, that's a liberal idea. and that didn't quite work, either. massachusetts has the best educate
this stuff also about the educational stuff like the policy-making situations which i'm very interested in. it's a great thing washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span has covered it. >> c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the eco
. >> and you met with the families of these victims, 20 kids six educators, that must have been one of the most difficult things you have ever done in your life. >> i was a part of it, but quite frankly, the people assigned to work with them, the one-on-one's, the interviewers that had to sit with the people, those were very hard jobs to do. there were so many people that played such a major role in this whole situation that it really was spread out among many. >> i know the whole thing has been painful. painful for all of us who have been here. i can only man what the families were going through. but is there one moment that stands out in your mind that you will never forget the rest of your life? >> i think the crime scene itself is something has made an indelible mark on our minds. if you were tasked with the responsibility of going into the crime scene, it is something you will never be able to erase. >> you mean, when you walked into the sandy hook elementary school and you saw the bodies of little kids on the floor? >> yes. >> how can you -- that must be so shocking and traumatic? >> it i
and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all," should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency, and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it. when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground, and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thub voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and it seems that the word "poverty
. the degree to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched wha
of advocating for him -- jeanne appointed me to my first public role to advocate on an education commission. that is what got me familiar with the new hampshire legislature and ultimately led to my first run for office. >> carol, were you born aspiring for politics? >> i grew up in a large irish catholic family. my parents took in every child who needed it. we had three generations in the house. i was pressed into political service when i was 6 years old because my parents were active republicans. i carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, sh
and well. the things he has done, whether it is health reform or education reform, making higher education more affordable, expanding pell grants, creating the consumer financial protection bureau. they are all aimed at one thing -- to create a economy in which we have a vital middle-class and our tax policy reflects that as well. opportunity is broadly available. i think that is solidly in the mainstream of the democratic party. we can have a debate about means of achieving that, and i think we have to do some soul- searching about how in the 21st century we achieve those goals, and whether all the avenues and pathways that made sense 50 and 60 and 70 years ago are still valid today. many of them may be -- some may not. on the fundamental goals, he is solidly in the position of the democratic party, solidly progressive. i think that is a lot of what the election was about. >> in this election it has been observed that much of the advertising was predominantly negative. i would like to ask -- i know both sides of campaigns engaged in this. including an obama at that scene to insinuate that
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
founders were not so foolish as to suppose that freedom can thrive or survive without appropriate education and nourishments of character. they understood this must mean education broadly understood to include not just schools, but all the institutions of civil society that explain freedom and equip citizens with the virtues freedom requires. these virtues includes self- control, modernization. these reinforce the rationality essential to human happiness. notice when madison like the founding father's generally spoke of human nature, he was not speaking as modern progressives do as manage inconstant, something evolving, something constantly formed and reformedly changing social and other historical forces. when people today speak of nature, they generally speak of flora and trees and animals and other things not human. but the founders spoke of nature as a guide to and as a measure of human action. they thought of nature not as something merely to be manipulated for human convenience but rather as a source of norms to be discovered. they understood that natural rights could not be asserted,
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
million over five years to develop a sustainable public health education campaign to address the pervasive public health problem of tobacco use in kids. we are looking forward to coming back to you again for the future to tell you how this campaign will be unveiled, how it will be launched, and how we focus on many parts of the youth population to send a message of prevention. overall, the survey is still valuable because of reports usage rates not just for tobacco but all illicit drugs and alcohol as well. when you put it altogether, some 40% of 10th graders and about half of 12th graders are using at least one if not several of these substances. we must work together to prevent -- we must work together for prevention to force alcohol control policies, trade environments that empower young people not to drink or use other drugs for use tobacco, identify alcohol and other drug abuse disorders early and provide brief intervention, referral, and treatments and reduce inappropriate access to a use of prescription drugs. i am grateful to the doctor who has supported a robust research portfolio
by this incredible will that he had and nursed for education. -- thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that your. -- year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the le
the country observed a moment of silence for the 20 children and 6 educators. today there is a walk for peace in newtown, and three more children will be laid to rest. ana grace marquez-green, who lost to count and sing. josephine grace gay, who celebrated her 7th birthday. and emilie alice parker. lots of backlash for the nra for their statement friday. gabby and i are extremely disappointed by the nra's defiant suppose. they could have chosen to be a voice for the own members who want common sense, reasonable safeguards on deadly firearms. but instead it chose to defend extreme pro gun positions that aren't even popular among the law-abiding gun owners it represents. the national rifle association is speaking out on the massacre, saying the answer is to deploy armed guards at schools. and they're not the only ones joining the debate. >> columbine. >> virginia tech. >> tucson. >> aurora. >> ft. hood. >> oak creek. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> newtown. >> how many more? >> how many more? >> how many more colleges? >> how many more classrooms? >> how many more movie theatres? >> how
there's clearly a connection with schooling and education. but there's also a great value in this community for e memorializing in terms of a park or a playful place, but also a place of quiet. so i think all of those ideas will be seriously considered and evaluated and a decision was made by a group of people that will be selected for that purpose. >> i wish you the best of luck. i think i speak for everyone around the country and around the world when i wish you a holiday season of healing and i wish you the best of luck as you preserve all of these memorials around newtown. thank you so much. >> i appreciate that so much. have a peace-filled holiday. >> thank you. please keep us posted on your progress. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more
question, lots of answers. about 200 educators in utah are mulling that over today after attending classes on firearm use and safety. the course of geared toward teachers. instructors are not trying to persuade teachers to carry guns in schools, but to provide the information and training they need in the wake of the newtown massacre. the classes have been going on for some time and some teachers are sold on the idea of arming themselves. others simply want to explore their options. >> i think it's important to have protection because if you don't have it, i feel like we're sitting ducks. >> we're going to help them understand where their moral code and value system really is. until they discover that, they are not prepared to carry a firearm. >> utah already allows teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been shoved to his death from a subway platform in new york city. it happened last night in queens. police and witnesses say a woman who had been pacing and mumbling pushed a man in front of the number 7 train before running down two f
will hold more safety education in those schools to teach kids how to dial with the traffic and cut down some of the risky moves you saw. >> katie: bay area charity has put out a holiday wish list and it's in dire need of christmas hams. st. anthony's foundation needs to collect 500 hams so it can serve traditional christmas dinner. it made a similar appeal for curbing can i and was able to surpass its -- for turkeys and was able to is your sur pass its goal. >> you still have just a few hours to make sure bay area kids get a toy for christmas. east palo alto police department is asking for last minute donations. department provides more than 1500 toys to families every year. organizers so far have come up short this year. bring donations to east palo alto stil city hall until 9:00 this morning and toys will be handed out an hour later at 10:00. for most on that drive and others, go to abc7news.com and click on see it on tv. hopefully everyone will get what they need over the next few days. everyone needs an umbrella. >> lisa: we have thunderstorms in the area and high surf advisory. a l
tax cuts for people under $250,000. but it will include the education tax credit and the child tax credit and the earned income tax credit. these are refundable tax credits that affect mostly low-income people. so that will be on the table. but, you know, the republicans, the disdain that i have seen for poor people, from people who are struggling, like senior citizens on medicare and social security, for low-income people and the women, infant, and children program, we saw the republicans last week vote to spending cuts that would literally take food out of the mouths of hungry babies and in this country, you want to talk about crisis, fiscal crisis, et cetera, a crisis is that one out of five american children is hungry at some point during the year. that is just immoral. and they voted to even cut that. and so i agree with you. i think we have to talk about the consequences for real people. middle class, and as the president said tonight, those who aspire to the middle class. and that would include the unemployed right now, and we're going to extend unemployment insurance benefi
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